GET THE FACTS

THE KNOWLEDGE BASE PROBLEM MUST BE SOLVED

“The mistaken idea that reading is a skill,” notes University of Virginia cognitive scientist Daniel Willingham, “may be the single biggest factor holding back reading achievement in the country. The knowledge base problem must be solved.”

Reading comprehension depends on broad knowledge and a large vocabulary.

From newspapers to novels, all texts for literate adults omit basic information—they use terms, draw analogies, and make references without offering definitions or explanations. In short, they assume that the reader has a base level of knowledge. In order for children to grow into literate adults that read widely with ease, all schools must make building broad knowledge—teaching all the knowledge that writers assume readers have—job one.

To learn more, read “Can Reading Comprehension Be Taught?” by Daniel Willingham and watch Willingham’s video, “Teaching Content Is Teaching Reading.”

Reading comprehension depends on broad knowledge and a large vocabulary.

From newspapers to novels, all texts for literate adults omit basic information—they use terms, draw analogies, and make references without offering definitions or explanations. In short, they assume that the reader has a base level of knowledge. In order for children to grow into literate adults that read widely with ease, all schools must make building broad knowledge—teaching all the knowledge that writers assume readers have—job one.

To learn more, read “Can Reading Comprehension Be Taught?” by Daniel Willingham and watch Willingham’s video, “Teaching Content Is Teaching Reading.”

Reading comprehension depends on broad knowledge and a large vocabulary.

From newspapers to novels, all texts for literate adults omit basic information—they use terms, draw analogies, and make references without offering definitions or explanations. In short, they assume that the reader has a base level of knowledge. In order for children to grow into literate adults that read widely with ease, all schools must make building broad knowledge—teaching all the knowledge that writers assume readers have—job one.

To learn more, read “Can Reading Comprehension Be Taught?” by Daniel Willingham and watch Willingham’s video, “Teaching Content Is Teaching Reading.”

Reading comprehension depends on broad knowledge and a large vocabulary.

From newspapers to novels, all texts for literate adults omit basic information—they use terms, draw analogies, and make references without offering definitions or explanations. In short, they assume that the reader has a base level of knowledge. In order for children to grow into literate adults that read widely with ease, all schools must make building broad knowledge—teaching all the knowledge that writers assume readers have—job one.

To learn more, read “Can Reading Comprehension Be Taught?” by Daniel Willingham and watch Willingham’s video, “Teaching Content Is Teaching Reading.”

Reading comprehension depends on broad knowledge and a large vocabulary.

From newspapers to novels, all texts for literate adults omit basic information—they use terms, draw analogies, and make references without offering definitions or explanations. In short, they assume that the reader has a base level of knowledge. In order for children to grow into literate adults that read widely with ease, all schools must make building broad knowledge—teaching all the knowledge that writers assume readers have—job one.

To learn more, read “Can Reading Comprehension Be Taught?” by Daniel Willingham and watch Willingham’s video, “Teaching Content Is Teaching Reading.”

Reading comprehension depends on broad knowledge and a large vocabulary.

From newspapers to novels, all texts for literate adults omit basic information—they use terms, draw analogies, and make references without offering definitions or explanations. In short, they assume that the reader has a base level of knowledge. In order for children to grow into literate adults that read widely with ease, all schools must make building broad knowledge—teaching all the knowledge that writers assume readers have—job one.

To learn more, read “Can Reading Comprehension Be Taught?” by Daniel Willingham and watch Willingham’s video, “Teaching Content Is Teaching Reading.”

Reading comprehension depends on broad knowledge and a large vocabulary.

From newspapers to novels, all texts for literate adults omit basic information—they use terms, draw analogies, and make references without offering definitions or explanations. In short, they assume that the reader has a base level of knowledge. In order for children to grow into literate adults that read widely with ease, all schools must make building broad knowledge—teaching all the knowledge that writers assume readers have—job one.

To learn more, read “Can Reading Comprehension Be Taught?” by Daniel Willingham and watch Willingham’s video, “Teaching Content Is Teaching Reading.”

Reading comprehension depends on broad knowledge and a large vocabulary.

From newspapers to novels, all texts for literate adults omit basic information—they use terms, draw analogies, and make references without offering definitions or explanations. In short, they assume that the reader has a base level of knowledge. In order for children to grow into literate adults that read widely with ease, all schools must make building broad knowledge—teaching all the knowledge that writers assume readers have—job one.

To learn more, read “Can Reading Comprehension Be Taught?” by Daniel Willingham and watch Willingham’s video, “Teaching Content Is Teaching Reading.”

KNOWLEDGE NEEDS CHAMPIONS - AND THAT'S WHAT THIS CAMPAIGN IS ABOUT